Leek, Potato & Broccoli Soup {vegan}

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Fancy schmancy green smoothies are fine by me. But I like to kick it old school with my blended vegetables sometimes — with some green soup.

We get our color from broccoli and spinach and then trick it out with non-juice things like potatoes, leeks and garlic and top it all off with maple balsamic caramelized onions and some toasted almond flakes.

These onions are ideal on pretty much anything savory. I recommend adding a pinch of chili flakes to the batch for the perfect sweet and spicy mix. I love these on sandwiches, on roasted vegetable salads and stirred in to soup for extra texture and excitement.

There’s plenty of time for green juice in the future. Today, we soup!

green soup 2

Leek, Potato & Broccoli Soup

  • 1 tablespoon oil (I used macadamia oil)
  • 2 medium-large leeks, cleaned and finely sliced
  • 6 garlic cloves, finely chopped
  • 1 teaspoon fennel seeds
  • 1 large potato, peeled and cut into small pieces
  • 4 cups vegetable broth
  • 1 medium head broccoli, trimmed and cut into small pieces
  • 3 cups spinach
  • salt and pepper, to taste

In a large pot heat oil over a medium high heat. Add leeks and a pinch of salt and cook, stirring, for about 5 minutes until the leeks soften. Add a splash of warm water to the pan if the leeks are sticking at all. Add garlic and fennel seeds and cook for another minute, stirring.

Add potato and vegetable broth to the pot and bring to a boil. Once boiling add broccoli and cover the pot reducing to medium-low. Let cook for about 10 minutes until everything cooks through and the potatoes are easily pierced with a fork. Stir in spinach.

Allow to cool for 10 minutes. Puree in a blender in batches or use a stick blender to get a smooth consistency. Season.

Serve with maple balsamic caramelized onions (see below) and toasted almond flakes.

Maple Balsamic Caramelized Onions

  • 1 tablespoon oil
  • 3 medium red onions – or a mix of yellow and red (whatever you’ve got) thinly sliced into half-moons
  • salt
  • 1 tablespoon balsamic vinegar
  • water
  • 1 teaspoon maple syrup
  • pinch of chili (optional)

In a large pan, heat oil over a medium heat. Add onions and a pinch of salt and cook, stirring occasionally, for about 10-15 minutes, until very softened and getting golden. Add a little splash of water at any point if the pan gets too dry.

Add balsamic vinegar and allow to bubble down and reduce, about 2 minutes. Reduce heat to medium-low and cook for another 10 minutes (again, adding small splashes of water as needed.) Once completely softened, turn off the heat and stir in the maple syrup, another pinch of salt and chili (if you’re into that sort of thing). Stir to combine and set aside until you’re ready to serve.

I love having this on hand in the fridge for a couple of days to add to anything and everything.

Thai Spiced Carrot Soup {Vegan}


My Sunday food prep sessions have really upped my game in the kitchen throughout the week. Chopping and roasting vegetables and cooking grains seems like a simple enough practice, but the difference is major. It makes everything just a little bit easier and gives my brain a break in the post-work scramble to make something healthy for dinner.

If I’m smart enough to make a soup during my Sunday prep session, it usually makes a dinner for Fabian and I, plus a couple of lunches for me or portions to freeze in case of laziness. It’s the pureed (or chunky – depending on the week) dish that keeps giving.

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Vegetable Miso Ramen

vegetable miso ramen #voraciousvander

While we’re talking food hugs. Let’s talk about miso broth and noodles.

I mean, if warming and satisfying are what you’re after, a big bowl of flavorsome broth,  full of veggies and noodles is a good way to go.

It’s the perfect sick person food. Or well person food. Or tired and hungry person food.

This, paired with some sassy comments from Maggie Smith, is guaranteed to soothe most troubles away.

I have limited ramen knowledge, but I know that there are a few different types of broth that can be used when fashioning a bowl of the noodle soup.

This is an easy miso-based one that requires little more than stirring miso paste into some simmering stock. It’s a simple way to get your bowl of goodness started pronto.

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Red Lentil Dahl with Kale

voraciousvander -RL dahl

Even in summertime I crave comfort dishes. I’m talking warm, heavily spiced bowls of things that might make you sweat a little when you eat them. I dunno. I’m aware that no one likes to sweat whilst eating, but I’ll take it over eating chilled soup. Gazpacho? I just…can’t. I’m sorry. (Not sorry.)

You know I’m game for a massive minimal-cookingrequired salad, but homegirl needs a cooked meal several times a week, regardless of the weather. It’s something about sitting down at night to eat something that has a story. Something that’s been chopped and sautéed and simmered.

I love experimenting with cuisines that I find a little intimidating, it’s like facing your fears in a totally contained and inconsequential way!

Whatta rush.

Since I’ve been cooking, I’ve found Thai and Indian cuisines to be among my favorites to make at home. Mostly because they involve big vats of stew-like concoctions that can be custom-made to involve heaps of vegetables, tons of flavor and spice, and require being mopped up with rice and/or flatbread. (In general, I enjoy mopping my food up with carbs. It’s satisfying and delicious.)

Plus, a good curry paste can’t really let you down.

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Broccoli and Leek Soup

I’m gearing up to tell some stories. Actually, I’ll just be telling one specific story, multiple times.

This weekend, F’s parents are throwing us our Australian engagement party. It’s going to be a lovely night in the backyard with friends, family, good food and bubbles.

There’s one catch: I’ll be obliged to tell the story of our engagement to many of the guests. While I’ve already had quite a bit of practice in the two months we’ve been engaged, I still haven’t got better at telling it.

Where do I start? One minute, I was on a rooftop in New Orleans’ French Quarter laughing at his pre-proposal speech, not being able to take a compliment and the next I realized what was going on. I think I probably just sound like a jerk when I tell it…I dunno.

It was a perfect night – like, majorly – and we were the happiest couple in NOLA, I just wish I could express the sequence of events better!

It doesn’t really matter though – we’re just excited to celebrate with the people we love.

I wish I had a better story about this soup too, but the truth of the matter is that I found myself on a Monday waiting for my fruit and veg delivery and very hungry. I scraped around the crisper and came out with a head of broccoli and a big leek. Instead of an omelet or some quick stir fry I opted for a simple and silky smooth soup.

Admittedly, you have to be a broccoli fan for this one, but you could try subbing in more potatoes or roasted carrots instead. I like to garnish the whole thing with chives, which add a nice mellow onion-y compliment to the leeks. I also think a little grating of Parmesan or cheddar would go over extremely well in this situation.

The end.


  • 1 medium head of broccoli, cut into small florets
  • 1 large leek, white and light green parts sliced thin
  • 1 small-medium white potato, pealed chopped into 1/2-inch pieces (about 1/2 cup)
  • 1 tablespoon fresh thyme
  • olive oil
  • 2 cloves of garlic, finely chopped
  • 1 liter or 4 cups vegetable broth
  • salt & pepper
  • 1-2 tablespoons chopped chives, to serve

In a large pot, heat a glug of olive oil over a medium high heat. Add leak and garlic and sauté until the leek is softened, about 5 minutes. Stir in the thyme and cook for another minute.

Pour in vegetable broth and bring to a boil. Add broccoli and potato and reduce heat to medium. Simmer for 10 minutes until the broccoli and potatoes are tender.

Allow the soup to cool for a few minutes and purée with a stick blender or in batches in the blender.

Pour back into the pot, bring to a boil and and simmer for another 5-10 minutes. Serve with chopped chives and extra black pepper.